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dr_frog

Unregistered

1

Saturday, July 11th 2009, 10:02am

Lightning struck my SPrinkler system

During a bad storm, lightning blew my indoor sprinkler control box off of my garage wall. Obviously it was damaged, so I ordered the correct parts and rewired and reattached all of the stations and new wiring and existing wiring from the stations to the indoor box. I turned on the power and all of the stations are receiving power as evidenced by a voltmeter. However, no sprinkler is actually coming on despite the control box saying it is on. I have tried each of the 6 stations and not one comes up. I am lost and have no idea what to do.

dr_frog

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,087

Location: Metro NYC

2

Saturday, July 11th 2009, 1:06pm

field wiring is probably fried - that includes the solenoids on the valves.

dr_frog

Starting Member

3

Saturday, July 11th 2009, 3:09pm

I did go out to each valve box on the lawn and noticed the solenoids were blown... What is the next step in repair? Do I need to dig up the entire wiring system? I have a six station system. Do I need this to be professionally done? What do you think the cost of this type of repair would be?

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,464

Location: USA

4

Saturday, July 11th 2009, 10:40pm

I don't get a lot of calls due to lightning. The one time I can remember the controller was obviously fried. Black and melted. I wound up replacing the controller and the solenoids. The wiring survived. Try replacing the solenoids and see what happens.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,087

Location: Metro NYC

5

Sunday, July 12th 2009, 6:24am

Replacing field wiring is labor-intensive, depending on how long a run it is. Do the obvious stuff first, like the solenoids, and that could very well be enough.

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