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JP

Unregistered

1

Wednesday, October 5th 2016, 10:41am

Input on a DIY design

I have been doing a landscape project to redo my entire property. For the past few seasons we have been living with a less than optimal layout, but next year is the year to take the plunge and redo the sprinkler.

I have done a fair amount of reading on designing sprinkler systems and had a design done by Rainbird. For the most part I was happy with their design, but was not happy about their recommended flows per zone and some layout that I did not care for.

So we have a few areas we don't plan to finish for a few years, but I want to anticipate the changes in my design. thus the two designs. The main line into the house is a 1" soft copper line to a 3/4" meter. 1/4 of the sprinkler feed line through the house is 1" copper and the remainder is 3/4" copper. My water pressure at the back flow is approx 100psi, but can be as low as 90 depending upon the day. I did a bucket test on a day when the line was at 100psi. I regulated the line pressure with a full port ball valve and got a flow of 10gal/min @ 80psi and 14gal/min @ 60 psi.
So I'm thinking that I can reduce my line pressure.

I should also note that the house sits on the highest spot on the property an falls off by about 10-15 feet around the property. The first two are the beds as they currently sit. The second two are the additions that will happen within the next 5 or so years.

Thank You for any help and advice.
Best,
Justin
<img src="http://i346.photobucket.com/albums/p402/justinpeskar/Current%20Beds%20-%20Spray%20Patterns_zpsdmx70e1u.jpg" alt="Current%20Beds%20-%20Spray%20Patterns_zpsdmx70e1u.jpg" title="Current%20Beds%20-%20Spray%20Patterns_zpsdmx70e1u.jpg" style="font-size: 1em;" /> <img src="http://i346.photobucket.com/albums/p402/justinpeskar/Current%20Beds%20-%20Pipe%20Layout_zpspxu1w2wj.jpg" alt="Current%20Beds%20-%20Pipe%20Layout_zpspxu1w2wj.jpg" title="Current%20Beds%20-%20Pipe%20Layout_zpspxu1w2wj.jpg" style="font-size: 1em;" /> <img src="http://i346.photobucket.com/albums/p402/justinpeskar/New%20Beds%20-%20Spray%20Patterns_zps322pr0vl.jpg" alt="New%20Beds%20-%20Spray%20Patterns_zps322pr0vl.jpg" title="New%20Beds%20-%20Spray%20Patterns_zps322pr0vl.jpg" style="font-size: 1em;" /> <img src="http://i346.photobucket.com/albums/p402/justinpeskar/New%20Beds%20-%20Pipe%20Layout_zpshfaqf2xs.jpg" alt="New%20Beds%20-%20Pipe%20Layout_zpshfaqf2xs.jpg" title="New%20Beds%20-%20Pipe%20Layout_zpshfaqf2xs.jpg" style="font-size: 1em;" />

JP

Unregistered

2

Wednesday, October 5th 2016, 10:51am

sorry Images didn't attach right










Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,219

Location: Metro NYC

3

Thursday, October 6th 2016, 7:43pm

It looks like your design service got it just about right. You say the street pressure can drop in summer, and you get an off-peak 'bucket test' of 10 gpm @ 80 psi. Subtract 10 psi for summertime, then subtract 10-20 psi for losses through backflow preventer, zone valves and system pipe and fittings. Now you have 10 gpm @ 50-60 psi. I'd say you're good.

JP

Unregistered

4

Friday, October 7th 2016, 6:59am

Wet_Boots,
Thanks! This is my design. I found software package that allowed me to do the prints. This design is a modification of the designers concept.

I should have added that the "bucket test" was post backflow preventer, but looking at the charts that may only be a few psi so I will keep the pressures the same. Since this was my first design, I had some trouble selecting nozzles for the rotors. Spray and rotatory nozzles are easy-er but rotors are a bit of a mind trick. I really had trouble selecting between the blue 2.5 and 3 for the I20 heads. As well as when to use a short radius and low angle. I think I'm happy at this point

One other question, on the sprays would you recommend a pressure regulated head over a regulator at the valve?

Thank You,
JP

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,219

Location: Metro NYC

5

Friday, October 7th 2016, 1:30pm

If you think you won't get what you need from flow-control zone valves, you probably go with in-head regulation as the surest thing. Sprays and rotors have different operating pressures, so one single regulator upstream won't be optimum for all heads.

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