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Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 371

Location: Central Minnesota

1

Tuesday, July 21st 2015, 10:32am

Potential customer drilling third well on his property

I have been working with a family on designing and quoting a system to water their +/- 3 acre màintained lawn and landscaping. The initial visit was to discuss options, measure the property and get water readings. The property has two deep wells, one supplying the house and another, abandoned, well previously used for watering a large garden. Upon discussion with the homeowner, he informed me that the well supplying the house was probably not a viable option. No problem, I would rather see the second well dedicated to the system anyway. The well has no pump currently, so I instructed him to contact a well company and have them test the reclaim rate. Not good. 4gpm. Fortunately, he had the sense to have them test the house well also. No good. 8gpm. After discussing options, potential issues, and design dilemmas based on such a low producing well, he decided to have the well company come and drill a third well in hopes of finding a better producing vein.

Throughout this process, I have submitted bids based on what we could potentially get from this new well and priced according to flow rates. This property is full sun and pure sand. I have expressed my concerns of installing a system based on such low flow rates and lawn conditions as they are. I work on multiple town home complexes with systems in excess of 24 zones and know how difficult it is to manage a watering schedule for a system of that size.

I should find out today what the output of this new well is. But my question is, do the rest of you contractors have issues installing systems in excess of 18 zones? My concern is that we'll find out he now owns a third low producing well and will want to go ahead anyway with the project after spending money drilling an irrigation well.

The current bids only cover the highly visible areas of the front lawn and at 15gpm come out to 10 zones. I have bid in the ability to expand the system with extra wire and modular contoller. That doesn't include landscape beds or any of the back lawn. Total zones could reach 24 easily, and runtimes in excess of 30 hrs. Even after splitting the program, The system would potentially run 15hrs during the peak of summer.

Would you install it?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,288

Location: Metro NYC

2

Tuesday, July 21st 2015, 5:59pm

There is a possibility of letting a low-producing well fill a holding tank, and having a secondary pump feed the system from the tank. If the property was level, a simple jet pump could do the work. 25 gpm @ 50 psi could do good work on a property like you describe.

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 371

Location: Central Minnesota

3

Tuesday, July 21st 2015, 7:13pm

I mentioned it as a last resort. The customer wasn't thrilled with the idea of excavation and expense of tanks. The well driller may have done some persuading as well, as he mentioned the low producing wells are quite surprising, from his decades of experience the area has some decent aquifers. Especially considering there are center pivots in the field across the road. Doesn't mean much, I know, but you'd think the guy would have some on 10 acres.

As of now, the well guy is the only one making any money. Hopefully tomorrow brings good news.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,288

Location: Metro NYC

4

Tuesday, July 21st 2015, 8:37pm

If the property is as sandy as you say, then you need water, and you need to be able to apply it heavily. Accept that requirement, then figure out how it gets done. I've seen trade mailings about these 'accumulator' setups in basements (heavy polyethylene tanks with a jet pump sitting on top)

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