You are not logged in.

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

Sambo

Unregistered

1

Monday, June 22nd 2015, 5:31pm

Water Softener Bypass During Irrigation

My house has a water softener installed in an out building near the well which softens ALL of the water that comes to the main house. I would like to bypass the water softener during irrigation times, and wonder if this has been accomplished by anyone.

Originally, I had figured to use a 3-way valve and a check valve or two to bypass the softener. Now, I think two valves might be the way to go. I'd install a tee after the pressure tank, and have a valve on both exiting legs of the fitting. One would be normally open for typical water flow through the softener, and the other would be the bypass leg and be normally closed. When the signal is received, both valves change direction allowing water to bypass the softener and prevent flow through. In addition, I also plan to use a check valve before and after the softener to avoid softener media backflow. 8|

I'd like to use a remote transmitter/receiver, if such a thing exists, as my irrigation controller and softener are separated by almost 100' and several large pieces of concrete. Does anything like this exist? Am I stuck tunneling and burying?

Have any of you done something like this?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,153

Location: Metro NYC

2

Monday, June 22nd 2015, 8:13pm

It would probably make more sense to redo the sprinkler system supply line, even with the digging involved. You would be one and done.

Sambo

Unregistered

3

Tuesday, June 23rd 2015, 9:18am

Thanks for the reply, Wet Boots. That would involve chipping up the concrete slab of the out building, tunneling under the driveway, and a total run of more than 200'. I had considered that already, but with a job cost upwards of $3,000, it'd take a long time to pay off with saved bags of salt.

The softener bypasses itself automatically every time it regenerates, so I know the technology exists. I would like to know if it is something that someone else has done in a similar situation.

My third option is to move the softener into the main house, and re-direct all of the plumbing in the crawlspace. I don't know where I'd put it, but I guess it is an option.

I had hoped to find this conversation somewhere on the internet so I could use someone else's research, but as far as I can tell, the question hasn't been resolved in the public domain.

I'm probing now to see if anyone has done an automatic softener bypass.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,153

Location: Metro NYC

4

Tuesday, June 23rd 2015, 10:06am

I have seen in California, water softening done my way of a large resin cartridge tied into the plumbing. No regeneration. No salt. No tank. Very compact. Of course, that approach required that cartridges get swapped out, with the spent cartridge regenerated off-site.

You present a $3000 figure as if it is comparing to next to nothing by way of an extreme remedy to the initial bad design. No matter what you do to change this setup, you are going to be spending money by the hundreds. The question is whether you will be spending it wisely. There is very little you can expect from the trades on your bypass idea, because they would never propose any such thing.

Since bypassing a water softener involves turning valves, the simple way to achieve bypass when the sprinklers are running is to purchase three motorized ball valves, and to interface them with the controller. Very straightforward. Not very inexpensive.

P.S. - you don't need to bust up a slab to get a line into the outbuilding.

Sambo

Unregistered

5

Tuesday, June 23rd 2015, 11:49am

I was trying to avoid the plumbing changes, but it sounds like my idea is idiotic.

So I'm gathering that my best mode of attack will be to relocate the softener. I think it may fit near the water heater after some rearranging. I'll check it out when I get home. Fewer components means fewer things to go wrong over time too.

The softener should have never been located in the outbuilding. With this house, I seem to spend a lot of time doing things the way they should have been done in the first place. I think the guy who built this place was a half-wit with a lot of confidence. Nothing is plumb, level, wired, or seals correctly. The whole house is half-assed, but with nice wood... 8|

Thanks for your responses.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,153

Location: Metro NYC

6

Tuesday, June 23rd 2015, 12:41pm

Definitely moving the softener is the way to go. (mind you, I'd like to see someone install a motorized bypass array with wireless controls 8o)

Similar threads

Rate this thread