You are not logged in.

spair2

New Member

Posts: 3

Location: USA

1

Sunday, June 24th 2007, 2:33am

Under Sidewalk Boring

Hi All,
This is an invitation to visit my web site www.originalbonehead.com It's a very inexpensive and fast way to get under a sidewalk or driveway, or stone wall or....
Have a look and let me know your thoughts.
Thanks, Steve

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,464

Location: USA

2

Sunday, June 24th 2007, 10:28am

Hi there. I'm not sure how it works in the rest of the country. But around her in So. Cal. we use a water jet to bore under sidewalks.
No pounding involved. I am an inventor myself and have a few tools I use on the job. I had a problem with the plastic pipe bending and coming out wherever it wanted to on the other side. So I made one with a 2 foot section of galvanized steel on the front with a brass nozzle. On the back a galvanized tee with a 5 inch nipple and a cap for a handle. And of course the hose fitting on the end. The rest of it is plastic so you can make it as long as you want by gluing on a new piece of pipe. This thing is deadly accurate. I bored 22 feet under a patio and actually hit the side of the manifold I was replacing. I'm not claiming this as an invention. But, I like always say, you can never have too many tools. I wouldn't mind having a couple boneheads on my truck.
Good job!
If I can't fix it, it's broken!

HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

3

Monday, June 25th 2007, 4:45am

Not impressed...

...given that all it appears to be something along the lines of a nose cone.

Conceptually, I did the same thing on my own. I got a 3/4" piece of black pipe the width of the sidewalk, placed a 3/4" to 1/2" reducer fitting on the front of it, and a 1/2" nipple in the other end of the reducer. The result was a somewhat pointy device that made a 1" bore with only a 3/4" pipe.

spair2

New Member

Posts: 3

Location: USA

4

Wednesday, June 27th 2007, 5:05am

Hey Guys,
Some of the nice things about the Bonehead. Recently, as now mentioned on my site, a Bonehead user went 12' under his driveway, using a 20' section of #4 rebar.
Washing under a driveway is a good way to end up with a huge crack. The concrete only gives a hard and stable surface to drive and park on. Its the base under the concrete which supplies the support. When with the Phone company, I had to make many of our sub contractors replace driveways because their liquid assisted boring machines washed just enough base soil that the driveway cracked when the home owner parked on it.
Just some words from experience. Washing under sidewalks is probably just fine, messy but fine, but I'd never do it under anything which vehicles passed over.

Take care guys,
The Original Bonehead
PS this isnt to make me money. Please read the About us page. Thanks!

HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

5

Wednesday, June 27th 2007, 10:05am

spair2,

If the Bonehead routinely works with #4 rebar, perhaps you should include that on the web page. It would seem that using rebar would lower the total cost of the Bonehead to the end user. For one, I believe rebar is cheaper than copper grounding rods (especailly with the run-up in copper prices in recent years), and you can frequently purchase rebar in short lengths when you're in those tight fits. Not only that, when working in limited areas, rebar can also bend (i.e. I bored a hole under my 11' driveway 18" under the driveway starting with a pilot hole drilled with 20' rebar using only a 5' long trench).

Rate this thread