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HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

11

Friday, April 21st 2006, 5:57am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by TimR</i>
In reading through info on PVBs, everything mentions that they only protect against backsiphonage and that they are not acceptable protection against backpressure.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

That's why it's required that the PVB be located higher than ANY of the spray heads. With all the rest of the irrigation plumbing downhill from the PVB, gravity can't create backpressure.

HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

12

Friday, April 21st 2006, 6:03am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by wetyet</i>
<br />Our county code for backflow protection here in Charlotte is an RPZ type, above ground, cover with the little "door" at the bottom. A licensed plumber pulls the permit and the city inspects from the cross connection to the backflow. Piping sch. 40, 12" deep and 5' copper legs incoming and outgoing of backflow.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Every location has different codes. That would be an example of one of the most restrictive.

My city (currently) is almost the exact opposite. I called the city building inspector before starting my irrigation systme and was informed that the only requirement is that some sort of backflow be installed. Beyond that, the SUGGESTED that a licensed plumber make the initial connection to your water main. But otherwise, no permits or inspections of any sort are needed.

When I went to start installing my irrigation system, I called the city inspector and was informed that currently no permit is required and that some sort of backflow prevention be installed

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