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City_Slicker

Active Member

1

Thursday, March 31st 2005, 4:51pm

Getting bid in writing Monday. What to look for?

FIRST POST, FIRST SPRINKLER SYSTEM!

Having a guy bid me a sprinkler on Monday. He actually gave me a verbal price and said it will be in writing Monday and I can sign his "contract". He said I pay 1/2 now for materials and 1/2 upon completion with a one year warranty. I visited with him yesterday and the price is right. Went over and looked at another system of his and he uses Rainbird Maxi-Pawl rotors. I have not seen these recommended on here. Whats the difference between these and the 5000's I have seen recommended?

I saw those and Rainbird popups on the side. Seemed to work good. But I have a few questions. He says he uses all Rainbird products. He shot me a really cheap off the hip quote and I am almost wondering whats wrong with this picture. But if it is all Rainbird and set up right. Where could I go wrong. I checked his references and they all seemed pleased. Just 2,300 seemed real cheap when my next highest quote was 3,600. THis is new construction and the yard hasnt even been leveled yet. So whatever he digs will just be deeper when they dump all the fill dirt that is needed.

How much overlapping should occur?
I have low water pressure (40-50) and 5/8 pipes. Is this gonna push it? He says it will be fine with 6 zones.
How many sprinklers per zone with this amount of pressure?
How deep should I insist the pipes be in Arkansas?

RidgeRun05

Supreme Member

Posts: 314

Location: USA

2

Saturday, April 2nd 2005, 5:31pm

The Maxi-Paw is an impact type rotor and the 5000 series is an internal gear driven type rotor. The Maxi-Paw may have its benefits as far as throw distance, but only if you have enough water pressure. The Maxi-Paw is more likely to fail, and you can forget about repairing these sprinklers on your own. In my opinion they stick out like a sore thumb because the diameter of the sprinkler is about 4 times bigger. This is probably why the Maxi-Paw is not a top selling sprinkler, and doesn't get reccomended that often. Just because it is a Rain-Bird system, there is a lot more than just setting it up right. Make sure you choose somebody you feel comfortable with and who you can trust. Has the guy been in business long, or is he just starting out and lowballing the competition. Is he using professional grade Rain-Bird parts, or home improvement store Rain-Bird parts? Is there a warranty on the parts, or just the labor? How much fill are you bringing in? The system should really be installed when the grade is at its final level, so as not to bury the sprinklers, or so that the pipe is no 2 feet in the ground. Overlapping should be head-to head coverage, which means each sprinkler head should spray to the next sprinkler head, and so on. 40-50 PSI with the Maxi-Paw rotors is probably not the best idea, unless you only have about 3-4 on a zone. If you use the gear driven type rotors, you can probably get away with 4-6 on a zone, depending on conditions. The pipes should be buried to plumbing code for your area, which varies from state to state. Generally, the main line under constant pressure is buried 18", and the lateral zone lines after the valves are buried according to your climate conditions. I hope this helps.

Tony
Tony Posey
Ridge Run Landscapes

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,044

Location: Metro NYC

3

Monday, April 4th 2005, 3:55pm

Get some references. Maxipaw sprinklers are not a standard first choice. They actually are good heads of their type (impact head) but they are not as reliable or as durable as gear-drive rotors. If you have concerns about your water supply pressure and flow, you want to space the heads fairly close together, maybe forty feet apart. I've used thirty-foot spacing when the pressure was low enough. Get a price for gear-drive rotors, either the Rainbird 5000 series or Hunter PGP series. The Hunter PGP's are best at using small amounts of water.

City_Slicker

Active Member

4

Saturday, April 23rd 2005, 5:33am

OK now I am really confused. Met with the guy and he said that the maxipaw was best for low pressure systems. Showed me how much harder it was to get the head to "pop up" with a screwdriver pushing from the bottom. Told him I wanted the 5000 plus and he pulled out what he called the 5004 and said it was the same thing. He is putting it in next week. Where can I get some more information? Should I talk to rainbird directly?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,044

Location: Metro NYC

5

Saturday, April 23rd 2005, 7:07am

It's kind of late to ask questions, if you've already signed a contract. Get the 5004's - they can be fitted with Rain Curtain nozzles, which achieve a very good spread of water at low pressures. It is true that a Maxipaw can throw water further at low pressure than a gear drive rotor can. But that only means possibly using less sprinkler heads, not a better sprinkler system. You probably want no more than forty feet spacing between heads on your pressure. The installer might have been planning for more distance between heads, and priced the system accordingly. If so, he might want additional money for more heads and zones, and would be justified in asking for it.

City_Slicker

Active Member

6

Friday, April 29th 2005, 5:28pm

OK, he is putting in the 5400's. Said he would try them and if they didnt work off the pressure I had he would switch them out. What he says is totally opposite of what I read here. He sas the maxipawls are made for low pressure. Told him to just split into more zones.I think he is getting irritated with me but said the price remained the same. Paid him his up from 1/2 today and signed the contract, now what do I watch for to make sure it is done right before he gets the other 1/2 other than it working????

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,044

Location: Metro NYC

7

Saturday, April 30th 2005, 3:49am

Stay firm in your resolve to have "sealed-case rotors" in your sprinkler system. (memorize that phrase) - it is the open-to-getting-fouled nature of the Maxipaws that make them less reliable than a good gear-drive rotor. The head-spacing question still remains, and if the system was going to be running with a sprinkler-head-pressure of 30 psi or less, the 5004's (or any gear-drive rotor) will throw less than a Maxipaw can. This is where closer head spacing, more heads, more zones, and more money come in.

It will help your contractor 'think out of the box' if he knows he'll be recompensed for the time and trouble. Make sure he knows that you're willing to pay for more heads and zones, if the change in sprinkler head requires them. Two or three hundred dollars extra might be in order, depending on circumstances.

City_Slicker

Active Member

8

Wednesday, May 11th 2005, 6:09pm

Got the system in and wrote the final check tonight. He used to 5000's with the rain curtain nozzles and it worked out great. Got 7 zones and head to head coverage. He did a great job and it works like a charm. Turns out I had more water pressure than I thought I did. Just backed off the heads per zone and they all throw fine. I would have had those loud maxi-pawls all the neighbors have if I hadnt stumbled in here and stuck to my guns with him on what I wanted.

Thanks for all the info guys!!

RidgeRun05

Supreme Member

Posts: 314

Location: USA

9

Friday, May 13th 2005, 5:49pm

Glad your happy with your new system, should you have any other questions, just stop by..There is a wealth of knowledge here and somebody will be able to help you out. It never hurts to get a second opinion.
Tony Posey
Ridge Run Landscapes

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