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PARTSPHIL

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1

Tuesday, January 23rd 2018, 10:16am

Valve location

I am about to install a new sprinkler system and am going off a design from rainbird. They show 3 valves close to the supply line and 2 more spaced out in different areas of the yard. What is the advantage to the valves being close to the zone that they serve as opposed to one manifold with all the valves close to the supply line? I am thinking I want to install all the valves (5) in one box and just run lateral line to the zones?????

Wet_Boots

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Posts: 5,277

Location: Metro NYC

2

Sunday, January 28th 2018, 10:34am

No problem with a single valve box. Indeed, several advantages with that configuration.

PARTSPHIL

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Monday, January 29th 2018, 4:16pm

Thanks for the input!

Inoh20

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4

Wednesday, January 31st 2018, 7:21pm

RE: Valve location

I am about to install a new sprinkler system and am going off a design from rainbird. They show 3 valves close to the supply line and 2 more spaced out in different areas of the yard. What is the advantage to the valves being close to the zone that they serve as opposed to one manifold with all the valves close to the supply line? I am thinking I want to install all the valves (5) in one box and just run lateral line to the zones?????

Inoh20

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5

Wednesday, January 31st 2018, 7:33pm

Valve Location

In my 25 yrs installing irrigation systems, I have never manifolded my valves. If you ever have a pipe or fitting repair needed, you will wish you had not. If you run your Irrigation mainline throughout the landscape, you can drop your section valve in such that you split your GPM in 1/2 right out of the valve. Using smaller pipe rather than large. Larger pipe from manifold to the section is more than running valve wire. Take good digital pictures and a to scale “as built plan”. Good luck

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,277

Location: Metro NYC

6

Friday, February 2nd 2018, 10:36am

For the sake of reader comprehension, it must be noted that the question and most recent comment are from unknown locations. In states with cold winters, nearly all residential systems are installed with poly pipe pulled into the ground with a special machine known as a vibratory plow, so that no trench digging is required. This method puts a valve manifold near the point where the water supply exits the house.

In warmer areas, where trenches are dug to lay in PVC pipe, zone valves may be scattered along a mainline that extends through the watered area. Less pipe is required, but the cost savings balances against the added cost requirement of control wires feeding the various valves. This field wiring is also a potential maintenance issue. Another maintenance issue will be grass growing completely over the tiny valve boxes enclosing the single zone valves.

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