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HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

1

Tuesday, February 10th 2004, 6:31pm

Manifold Design

In a related thread about manifolds, Tom stated that <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">I find a union isn't necessary, its just one more place for a leak to develop<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">.

My problem is that I can not figure out any good way to build a manifold that will allow you to place multiple valves in a single box and still allow you the ability to remove a single bad valve at a future time without disturbing the other valves.

My current design calls for a 90 degree elbow on both sides of the valve immediately followed by unions (again on each side of the valve. With this setup, I can comfortably install 4 valves in a typical 12"x17" box (5 if you don't want to leave any room for error) and still be able to completely remove just one valve without disturbing the rest.

What additional input do other's have in the design of the Manifold?


HooKooDooKu

Supreme Member

2

Tuesday, February 10th 2004, 6:31pm

Manifold Design

In a related thread about manifolds, Tom stated that <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">I find a union isn't necessary, its just one more place for a leak to develop<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">.

My problem is that I can not figure out any good way to build a manifold that will allow you to place multiple valves in a single box and still allow you the ability to remove a single bad valve at a future time without disturbing the other valves.

My current design calls for a 90 degree elbow on both sides of the valve immediately followed by unions (again on each side of the valve. With this setup, I can comfortably install 4 valves in a typical 12"x17" box (5 if you don't want to leave any room for error) and still be able to completely remove just one valve without disturbing the rest.

What additional input do other's have in the design of the Manifold?


drpete3

Supreme Member

Posts: 375

Location: USA

3

Wednesday, February 11th 2004, 7:59am

I think unions are fine. I do not install professionally but it sounds that if a valve fails you can buy a new valve and repair the old valve by removing the guts and replacing the parts from the new valve,therefore, no union necessary.
Thanks,

Pete

aquamatic

Advanced Member

Posts: 230

Location: USA

4

Wednesday, February 11th 2004, 8:55am

Go with the DURA Manifolds already built. COmes in various configs. LEts you easily unscrew a valve, extend, and gives a professional look to your install.

www.duraplastics.com

RVLI

Supreme Member

Posts: 460

Location: USA

5

Wednesday, February 11th 2004, 5:19pm

I build all mine by hand. Just as easy. I have heard of other contractors having problems with pre-fabbed manifolds.

aquamatic

Advanced Member

Posts: 230

Location: USA

6

Thursday, February 12th 2004, 3:31am

I just realized that Sprinkler Warehouse does sell the manifolds.
The trick to preventing and leaks on these is not to use any teflon tape when screwing on the valves. They have an O-Ring that does the seasling and the tape might affect the connection.

I always keep extra O-Rings on hand

Tom

Supreme Member

7

Thursday, February 12th 2004, 4:05am

like rvli, i build all mine with pvc slip fittings

FixItDaddy

Active Member

8

Tuesday, April 20th 2004, 1:08pm

pvc "manifold tees" work great. they give you some flexibility on valve arrangement.

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