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cwinship

New Member

1

Tuesday, June 14th 2016, 5:12pm

More help Identifying

I didn't want to muddy anyone else's threads about similar topics but I'm hoping someone can help me identify this valve.

It's circa 1980 install. Only identifying mark is "Toro Sprinkler Valve." The pictures are fuzzy but it seems almost like a 2 piece unit. The first half fits onto the copper feed line, and has what looks like a pneumatic actuator line. The other "half" has the barb that the actual output tube is clamped onto. It also has a manual shutoff screw on it. Then it seems like the halves snap, ( or maybe are supposed to be glued?? ) together.

Any help identifying this would be amazing. I'm trying to help mom out of a jam and get her sprinklers working again.
Thanks!





Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,255

Location: Metro NYC

2

Wednesday, June 15th 2016, 8:34am

That is a museum piece. Long out of production. Decades beyond being serviceable.

Time to enter the 21st Century and replace the valves and controller. Bring back photos of the plumbing. Tell us if there are multiple exit points from the house to the sprinkler system.

cwinship

New Member

3

Wednesday, June 15th 2016, 9:14pm

That is a museum piece. Long out of production. Decades beyond being serviceable.

Time to enter the 21st Century and replace the valves and controller. Bring back photos of the plumbing. Tell us if there are multiple exit points from the house to the sprinkler system.
Thanks. LOL I kind of figured that was the case since Google couldn't even find another picture of it.

I'll have to get some pictures but I hope it's pretty simple and cheap. It's only three zones and they all leave the house right in the same spot. All plumbed on 3/4" copper with threaded female NPT . Controller is in a closet space 4' directly above the valves.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,255

Location: Metro NYC

4

Thursday, June 16th 2016, 11:39am

Sounds like you'll have an easy time with a conversion. You want to bring copper to the outside. If the black plastic has the same outside diameter, you can use one of the existing exit holes. Another exit hole might work to carry wiring from inside to outside. If you don't have any experience soldering copper, you can use the popular alternative of "Sharkbite" compression fittings.

Part of the new work will involve a backflow preventer in the plumbing supply, or as a part of each new zone valve. Is this flat ground, or at least not sloping uphill from the house?

cwinship

New Member

5

Monday, June 20th 2016, 11:29am

Sounds like you'll have an easy time with a conversion. You want to bring copper to the outside. If the black plastic has the same outside diameter, you can use one of the existing exit holes. Another exit hole might work to carry wiring from inside to outside. If you don't have any experience soldering copper, you can use the popular alternative of "Sharkbite" compression fittings.

Part of the new work will involve a backflow preventer in the plumbing supply, or as a part of each new zone valve. Is this flat ground, or at least not sloping uphill from the house?
Hmmm sounds like I have to do a lot more research on the conversion. I was hoping i could just put new valves inside and avoid having to put the outside access box etc.

I'll take some photos and measurements... the current plastic lines exit through a field stone foundation, so snaking copper out through the same holes might be tricky, but once I've dug an access pit outside, probably manageable.

So I'm gathering, in broad strokes, The current "manifold" inside consisting of three 3/4" copper stubs would be replaced with a single copper line, with a new backflow installed, leading out to the outside access box. That box would then contain a new manifold and valves leading out to each zone?

Then a new controller, with wires leading back inside from the valves up to that controller.

And as for elevation, that's a good question. I'll have to do some rudimentary surveying. I know at least two zones are solidly downhill. But one is flat, or maybe possibly slightly inclined.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,255

Location: Metro NYC

6

Monday, June 20th 2016, 2:15pm

You don't necessarily dig a valve box outdoors, but you do have to have the control valves outside. What you have now was never acceptable under applicable plumbing codes. The simplest form of code-approved lawn sprinkler plumbing (assuming flat ground) has antisyphon zone valves, located a foot or more higher than the highest sprinkler head. That method combines the zone operation with backflow protection, and the only indoor plumbing required is the shutoff valve and a drain valve.

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