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plasmaphase

Unregistered

1

Monday, May 4th 2015, 7:31am

Irrigation zone with drip irrigation

I have a zone in my irrigation system (residential) that originally had 3 Hunter spray heads. I took one out when I extended my garden over top one of the heads and replaced it with a drip irrigation head. My problem is that I have to have the 2 other sprinkler heads running whenever I want to water my garden. Are there irrigation heads that can be disabled? I know another option would be to run an entirely independent zone for the garden, but that's a bit more work than I'd like to do. Any help or suggestions?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,123

Location: Metro NYC

2

Monday, May 4th 2015, 11:49am

Spray heads have nozzles that can shut down with a small flat-blade screwdriver.

plasmaphase

Unregistered

3

Wednesday, May 6th 2015, 8:27am

I looked at the sprinkler head and I don't believe that's correct. Hunter irrigation heads have an adjustment for the range of spray, and an adjustment for whether it's a straight stream or a wide mist/spray, but there's nothing allowing me to shut off that head. I guess they make a little plastic insert or tab that you can put in such that the head pops up, but doesn't spray. I'm not impress with Hunter heads...seems like that would be a standard feature to shut off a spray head.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,123

Location: Metro NYC

4

Wednesday, May 6th 2015, 10:24am

"spray head" is terminology for a head without moving parts
"rotor" head is terminology for a head that uses a moving stream(s) of water

TomSarko

Starting Member

5

Thursday, June 11th 2015, 1:08pm

Really? No one has pointed out the error of your way yet?

A control zone must possess no more than ONE water application rate per hour, or whatever unit you prefer.

There is alot of stupidity from even Rain Bird about application rates. Because they are a sprinkler company, where throwing over the water up in the air, where probably north of 12% escapes to the atmosphere, theyonly (wrongly) think in terms of "full-coverage" irrigation zones. This remains stupid, since about 1963 when drip irrigation first came on the scenes. Fifty-two years later, if they can't use "full-coverage" of the irrigated area, they cannot comprehend that shrubs and trees give two-shits if the area is fully wetted. Show them the right gallons per day, and they will find and use that water.

There is only one thing to do. Make a compromise in the water requirements across your control zone, i.e peak inches per day, then make up (determine) that zone's Application Rate, using square feet of canopy and a constant, 0.623, asdivisors to gallons applied per hour. Screw wetted area. This means, that as new landscapes mature, MORE WATER WILL BE REQUIRED, until canopy expansion ceases. This is 20-year old logic, and not in any means mine.

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