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Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,056

Location: Metro NYC

11

Wednesday, January 1st 2014, 10:34am

Put a pressure gauge on that zone. Get some caps (or plugs) and rework the test zone to have as little as one head spraying. You want to have at least 40 psi in that zone.

Once you see 40-50 psi sprinkler operation, you can have a proper idea of the actual flow you have available.

Is there a backflow preventer in place yet?

SmartEarthAustin

Senior Member

Posts: 19

Location: Austin Texas

12

Tuesday, January 21st 2014, 8:16pm

You should be fine with four i20 on a zone.

However you thinking is a little off when it comes to nozzles. The idea of the system is not to just come on but to water efficiently.

What I mean here.(just an example) the hydraulic calculations may very what nozzles you use
Example :
90 degree rotors should be 1gpm
180 degree rotors 2 gpm
360 degree rotors 4 gpm

The theory here is that it takes twice as long to make a pass for 360 as it does for 180 degree.
If you use all the same nozzles the corners and sides will have much higher precipitation rate than the center.
When you set a rotor from 90-360 degrees the rate that it rotates does not change.

Or you could just uses Hunter PRS40 heads and Mprotor nozzles. Then there is nothing to figure out. :)
http://www.smartearthsprinklers.com/

Cheers!

Gabriel
Licensed Irrigator
Austin, Texas

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "SmartEarthAustin" (Jan 22nd 2014, 8:54am)


gr0d

New Member

13

Thursday, February 27th 2014, 10:14pm

Put a pressure gauge on that zone. Get some caps (or plugs) and rework the test zone to have as little as one head spraying. You want to have at least 40 psi in that zone.

Once you see 40-50 psi sprinkler operation, you can have a proper idea of the actual flow you have available.

Is there a backflow preventer in place yet?
Hey guys, sorry for the long delay. It's been a long winter and haven't really been thinking about the system lately. However, the weather might break sooon, so looking to get things going again. I already have a backflow preventer in the system. The GPM and PSI was taken at the main valve box via the boiler drain I setup to drain the system.
I like the idea of the hunter prs40, it seems like that should do the trick with no thinking. What do you all think?

SmartEarthAustin

Senior Member

Posts: 19

Location: Austin Texas

14

Tuesday, May 6th 2014, 8:42pm

Put a pressure gauge on that zone. Get some caps (or plugs) and rework the test zone to have as little as one head spraying. You want to have at least 40 psi in that zone.

Once you see 40-50 psi sprinkler operation, you can have a proper idea of the actual flow you have available.

Is there a backflow preventer in place yet?
Hey guys, sorry for the long delay. It's been a long winter and haven't really been thinking about the system lately. However, the weather might break sooon, so looking to get things going again. I already have a backflow preventer in the system. The GPM and PSI was taken at the main valve box via the boiler drain I setup to drain the system.
I like the idea of the hunter prs40, it seems like that should do the trick with no thinking. What do you all think?


Can go wrong with the prs40 and Mp rotors. They are kinda hard to mess up.
http://www.smartearthsprinklers.com/

Cheers!

Gabriel
Licensed Irrigator
Austin, Texas

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