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4U2NVME

New Member

1

Saturday, June 22nd 2013, 1:49am

Do I need Hunter Pump Relay Start

HI all,

Ok sounds like a silly topic, but if I'm using the Irritol PC sprinkler controller, a pressure tank and pressure tank switch, do I need to use the Hunter Pump relay start, or will the pressure tank switch cut my pump in and out as my pressure tank drops below the designated pressure setting?

Other quick question, do I put a check valve in my system after my pump, but before my pressure tank if I am using a pump?

Thanks all.

4U2NVME.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,884

Location: Metro NYC

2

Saturday, June 22nd 2013, 7:58am

No relay needed, with pressure switch control.

For an above-ground pump feeding a pressure tank, I'd locate a check valve on the pump's suction side.

4U2NVME

New Member

3

Saturday, June 22nd 2013, 12:24pm

No relay needed, with pressure switch control.

For an above-ground pump feeding a pressure tank, I'd locate a check valve on the pump's suction side.
Thanks Wetboots, I have 15PSI of head coming to the pump, its on an irrigation system, do I still put the check valve before the pump??

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 3,884

Location: Metro NYC

4

Saturday, June 22nd 2013, 2:42pm

The pump creates increased pressure. The pressure tank stores that pressure. The check valve upstream of the pump isolates that increased pressure from the supply source. This increased pressure exists throughout the part of the system upstream of the zone valves, and that means improved zone valve reliability.

4U2NVME

New Member

5

Tuesday, July 2nd 2013, 12:14am

The pump creates increased pressure. The pressure tank stores that pressure. The check valve upstream of the pump isolates that increased pressure from the supply source. This increased pressure exists throughout the part of the system upstream of the zone valves, and that means improved zone valve reliability.
Thanks for the information, I have installed a check valve just as you stated. Who'd knew it take so long to install an irrigation system, 4 days, 15- 18 hour days and still going... getting a bit tired.. Be done soon... Or I"ll be done. 8|

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "4U2NVME" (Jul 17th 2013, 1:08pm)


electrifiedmale

Active Member

Posts: 31

Location: Longview, Texas

6

Tuesday, July 2nd 2013, 8:33pm

Who'd knew it take so long to install an irrigation system, 4 days, 15- 18 hour days and still going... getting a bit tired
LOL. I feel your pain. I did every inch of mine, I mean all of it, by myself. 47 heads, 9 zones and about 1300 feet of trenching. Took me a little over 2 months working all day on weekends and most weekdays after work till dark.

dd
experience is something learned just after you needed it most

4U2NVME

New Member

7

Wednesday, July 17th 2013, 12:01pm

Who'd knew it take so long to install an irrigation system, 4 days, 15- 18 hour days and still going... getting a bit tired
LOL. I feel your pain. I did every inch of mine, I mean all of it, by myself. 47 heads, 9 zones and about 1300 feet of trenching. Took me a little over 2 months working all day on weekends and most weekdays after work till dark.

dd
experience is something learned just after you needed it most

WOW 47 heads, I'm done for this year, I have 5 zones of sprinkler heads ( 28 heads ) and then I have two massive driplines I installed for two more zones, 7 total. I bypassed the pump, as I did not want to drive the pump all day to water lol, and I have about 12 - 15lbs of static head so I just have it running directly off that. I have no idea how much trenching I did, but had a huge trecher and spend about 12 - 14 hours trenching one day. Now 1/2 done, will finish next year for the rest of the yard. It seems to work fine, learned alot, hope it stands the test of time, I will probally do a few things differently next year, as in go deeper then 12 inches, as I had a few runs where I had my main pipe, 2" plus a couple lateral runs in the trench, so I was getting probally less then 6 inches coverage in some areas... we get cold here so not to happy, but if I blow out soon enough should be ok I'm thinking. :thumbsup:



-NV

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