You are not logged in.

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

11

Tuesday, June 5th 2012, 8:06am

We just had a drip irrigation class.
It was well attended.
They did echo something you said.
They said one reason they came was the myriad of options available confused them.
It's not near as complicated as people think but the hundreds of variations possible can be intimidating at first glance

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,076

Location: Metro NYC

12

Tuesday, June 5th 2012, 9:46am

the biggest problem with drip may be root intrusion with buried tubing - that won't be an issue with discrete emitters in tubing laid atop the soil, but they need a good deep ($$$) mulch cover to be immune to foot traffic

grote

Unregistered

13

Monday, April 22nd 2013, 7:27pm

drip

drip is hard to sell in st louis. because we have very good water supply/ pressures and people here just like to see a lot of water flying through the air. do a lot of micro-spray for pots. and people don't seem to understand that the drip needs to run long, so you go back and they've changed the drip run time to 10 minutes, becusea they think all the zones should run 10 minutes. then i yell aT THEM ABOUT CHANGING THE RUN TIMES I PUT IN WHEN I TURNED IT ON.

Scott76

Active Member

Posts: 46

Location: Kansas City

14

Thursday, May 2nd 2013, 1:59pm

As someone said before, I hate not being able to see the equipment working when checking a system. With sprays in a landscape bed I can visually verify everything is working properly before leaving the property. With drip, I get a frantic call from a homeowner about plants dying and why isn't the sprinkler working that I said was working. I've found some very specific uses for it that mostly revolve around single flower pots here and there.

DogT

Active Member

15

Saturday, May 18th 2013, 5:12pm

I'd like to use it and we tried the soaker hose, but the water just didn't spread enough in our soil to be effective. Thought about drip and decided that was a no go too, same thing with the soaker, we have so many leaves around here, raking up the leaves means getting into the drip or soaker system, too much extra work. Just doesn't work in all places, not that I'm enamored with the spray system either. But like others have said, you can see it work. I'd still use the soaker or drip in a veg garden though.

jpk

New Member

Posts: 9

Location: Pleasanton CA

16

Tuesday, May 28th 2013, 1:55pm

RE: Why aren't people converting to Drip irrigation?

We see it as a great benefit. Why the low interest?
Well I did a drip conversion, and it was a pita and has since developed a troublesome valve which may be a result of low flow.


I also had an original drip installation done in a different zone, and it went smoothly.

Overall I'm glad I went to drip, it's really saving water and reducing weeds, but I can't say it was easy.

On the other hand, if all the effort that went into the original spray installation had instead been put into drip in the first place, it would have been less total work and fuss total, and probably ended up more reliable.

jbeebo

New Member

17

Thursday, June 6th 2013, 1:26pm

drip: sparsely planted slope made of clay soil

I installed a new system on the hill in my backyard. Drip was intended from start due to following considerations:
-I live in hot dry climate of SoCal, and water in my town is very expensive. I.e. water efficiency a must.
-slope is sparsely planted with mostly shrubs and drought tolerant plants. Don't need water everywhere, just here and there.
-soil type is clay based. Max flow rate without surface run-off 2~4GPH.
-anywhere water falls, weeds will sprout. It's a major PITA to clear weeds off the slope.

I installed DIG filters, RainBird ASVF valves, Senninger pressure regulators (PS: DIG pressure regulators SUCK!), and PVC hard piping to bottom of slope. From buried hard piping, 1/2" black tubing runs on surface vertically up the slope spaced ~ 6ft apart. Then 1/4" line to either 1GPH or 2GPH PC drippers from RainBird and DIG. 1GPH for succulents and plants with shallow roots, 2GPH for rest like rosemary, sage, lantana, jasmin, etc. No plant is more than 4ft away from 1/2" line. System works great for 4yrs now, but I have had to replace ~5% of drippers in that time as they become contaminated and stop working. Rainbird drippers seemingly more susceptible. I'm happy with performance and plants do great with deep direct root watering from drip system.

Slope is not regularly walked on, but if so the drip tubing would be easily damaged. I would advise carefully routing if foot traffic is a concern. Might be better to install grid of buried hard piping with headers and run very short lengths of 1/4" tubing to plants. Keep people away from 1/4" tubing, it's delicate.

I'm have above ground garden boxes on the hill too; use drip line in the rows, on a separate zone because of higher watering requirement.

Anyone know what DC solenoids to use with RainBird ASVF valves and Hunter XC Hybrid controller?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,076

Location: Metro NYC

18

Friday, June 7th 2013, 5:48am

RE: drip: sparsely planted slope made of clay soil

I installed a new system on the hill in my backyard. Drip was intended from start due to following considerations:
-I live in hot dry climate of SoCal, and water in my town is very expensive. I.e. water efficiency a must.
-slope is sparsely planted with mostly shrubs and drought tolerant plants. Don't need water everywhere, just here and there.
-soil type is clay based. Max flow rate without surface run-off 2~4GPH.
-anywhere water falls, weeds will sprout. It's a major PITA to clear weeds off the slope.

I installed DIG filters, RainBird ASVF valves, Senninger pressure regulators (PS: DIG pressure regulators SUCK!), and PVC hard piping to bottom of slope. From buried hard piping, 1/2" black tubing runs on surface vertically up the slope spaced ~ 6ft apart. Then 1/4" line to either 1GPH or 2GPH PC drippers from RainBird and DIG. 1GPH for succulents and plants with shallow roots, 2GPH for rest like rosemary, sage, lantana, jasmin, etc. No plant is more than 4ft away from 1/2" line. System works great for 4yrs now, but I have had to replace ~5% of drippers in that time as they become contaminated and stop working. Rainbird drippers seemingly more susceptible. I'm happy with performance and plants do great with deep direct root watering from drip system.

Slope is not regularly walked on, but if so the drip tubing would be easily damaged. I would advise carefully routing if foot traffic is a concern. Might be better to install grid of buried hard piping with headers and run very short lengths of 1/4" tubing to plants. Keep people away from 1/4" tubing, it's delicate.

I'm have above ground garden boxes on the hill too; use drip line in the rows, on a separate zone because of higher watering requirement.

Anyone know what DC solenoids to use with RainBird ASVF valves and Hunter XC Hybrid controller?
What mesh are the filters you used? Since you employed antisyphon valves, I'm assuming this slope runs downhill from the home. Irritrol valves might have been a better choice, because there are DC latching solenoids for them.

As for the arrangement of drip components, I've heard that any poly piping in desert climates is susceptible to attack from animals in search of water. A more rugged arrangement would have all PVC plumbing, with emitter 'hubs' threaded on where appropriate. Spaghetti tubing still delivers the water to plants, but now a spaghetti tube can be damaged without any calamity, since the emitter would be upstream of the spaghetti tubing.

jbeebo

New Member

19

Friday, June 7th 2013, 11:06am

Thanks for comments Wet_Boots.

Yes, I considered ASV location w.r.t. the emitters and generally know about the code requirements. The buried hard pipe supply line runs from the bottom of the hill to the top. At the top corner of the slope, ~16" above grade are the RainBird ASVF valves so they are the highest point in the system above all emitters. The filter is 155mesh (DIG filter assy , DIG filters).

Thankfully I don't have an animal problem in my backyard, just 2 dogs a couple California Toads and various small lizards! I have heard of that though. The climate here is not so severe, Mediterranean vs. desert. Your suggestion to use buried hard pipe to emitter hub standoffs and spaghetti delivery tube is prudent, especially where people/animals are expected to be. I didn't take that route on the slope because digging thru that clay soil requires a pick axe and occasionally an impact hammer. It's strewn with rocks and is essentially concrete when dry, I'm amazed anything grows in it! Further, the dogs don't go up there and kids rarely do.

Regarding DC solenoids for Rainbird ASVF I've found these options, but don't know if either are compatible with Hunter XC Hybrid controller . Any idea?
RainBird TSOB. Clearly works in ASVF, but more expensive than DIG combo below. {edit: found it is compatible w/ battery controllers from Hunter}
DIG R710DC + DIG 30-921 adapters

So far, RainBird valves have worked flawlessly, but for the next project I'll look into those Irritrols you mentioned - thanks for tip! I've also had good luck with Hunter PGV anti-siphon valves w/ flow control, and there's a DC solenoid option from Hunter that fits.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "jbeebo" (Jun 7th 2013, 12:49pm)


Rate this thread