You are not logged in.

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

dclardy

New Member

1

Saturday, April 6th 2013, 4:50pm

Richdel 204 Low Flow

All,

I have an older Richdel 204 valve that has stopped working properly. It has very low flow to the heads, and I am not sure why. I have not removed it yet because I am not sure what parts I will need to fix it. I really don't want to replace the valve. Home Depot sales people really want me to do that for some reason.

I have unscrewed the bleed screw and get good flow. I have tried unscrewing the solenoid some, but it does not allow water to flow to the heads. This leads me to believe the diaphragm is bad? I have no experience with sprinkler repair, but I figured this would be a good start.

How can I repair this easily and correctly? It would be nice to unscrew a valve and pop the top on this one. Is that possible?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,043

Location: Metro NYC

2

Saturday, April 6th 2013, 6:14pm

You can always do a "guts swap" on a valve, where only the original valve body remains. R204 diaphragms are definite candidates for replacement.

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,457

Location: USA

3

Saturday, April 6th 2013, 7:45pm

This should do it.
Click on me

dclardy

New Member

4

Sunday, April 7th 2013, 8:57am

This should do it.
Click on me


Mrfixit,

Just so I understand, what is the process to fix it? Do I just open it up and change out parts? I have never seen the inside of a sprinkler valve so I am sure that I am making myself believe it is harder than it actually is. I just want to make sure that I have as complete a picture as I can before I start down the path.

Thanks for the help!

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 1,457

Location: USA

5

Sunday, April 7th 2013, 12:43pm

I need to make a youtube video of how to repair this particular valve. This is the only style valve I ever have to do this on.
--
Just unscrew the bonnet and take it off. Don't forget to turn the water off first.
Let all the water drain out. A pro doesn't have to let all the water drain but you better because it's easy to put this bonnet back on crooked or turned a little bit.
Make sure no debris gets inside the valve during this process. If it does flush it out.

Ok here's the part I've come to find is the best way of replacing the diaphragm and bonnet.
You want to do it all at once.

Attach the diaphragm and spring to the bonnet first then place the whole thing onto the valve body.
What you do is turn the screws through the diaphragm about three threads worth. Then pull the screws up so the diaphragm is tight against the bonnet.
You'll have to hold the diaphragm tight against the bonnet because the spring will be pushing it outwards.
Now you place the whole thing onto the valve body. Wiggle it back and forth until the bonnet is flush. Now tighten the screws while holding the bonnet in place.
Pay close attention to the screw holes and the small plastic nipple so the bonnet is on straight. You don't want to damage that nipple.
It's very easy to miss the holes and damage that nipple when you tighten the bonnet. That's why I do it this way.

You can try just placing the bonnet on the body first then the spring then the bonnet if you wish. That's how I used to do it until I learned but pay very close attention to that plastic nipple and screw holes. It's easy to mess up this way.

After you're done open the bleeder screw before turning the water back on. Turn the water on slowly. Then go back and turn the bleeder screw off. You do this to get the air out of the valve. A valve can stick on with air in there. Also adjust the flow control. You don't want it open all the way.

Let us know how it goes. Good luck!

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,043

Location: Metro NYC

6

Sunday, April 7th 2013, 12:43pm

If you buy the entire valve, you can use it as a guide to how everything goes together. First-timers do well to have the entire new valve in hand.

Similar threads

Rate this thread