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NABRIL

Active Member

1

Monday, December 10th 2012, 2:18pm

Guidance needed with positioning of nozzle heads

Hello

I have an issue with some sprinklers in my front lawn, and I appreciate your input. I enclose a picture of a side view of a section of my front lawn. To the right is a downward sloping span of 50 feet of so that starts at the feet of the house, and slopes down to the sidewalk. The black T's are the sprinkler heads labeled A, B, C, and D (Toro 570's..with 180 degree patterns for B, C, and D. A has a 90 degree pattern). Nozzle A gets the lawn, but also leaves a huge puddle out on the street. Nozzles B, C, and D are close enough to the edge that one of the sides of the stream somehow lands on the sidewalk. I have played with turning the risers a degree to either side, but my sidewalks always ends with huge puddles. On the right side (the slopped one), a lot of water slopes downward from all the watering of C and D and other heads and nozzles higher up.



1) I suppose I can replace A through D with ARM (adjustable) head nozzles, but I've played with them and I havent had consistent success. I've always had to go and tweak the nozzle head just to get it to come on; so I dont have a lot of faith on arm nozzles. What else can I use? The new rotary nozzles so as to direct the water farther away from the sidewalk? In other words, move the water away from the sidewalk, but keep it from reaching the street?

2) On the right (sloped) side? How can I prevent so much puddling? Water up top and let it trickle down more and turn off C and D?

3) I have a couple of heads that are clean and spray well, but I also see water coming out of the canister that screws into the ground; between the canister and the riser shoots a small stream upward.
NABRIL has attached the following file:

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,054

Location: Metro NYC

2

Monday, December 10th 2012, 2:49pm

Slopes are generally dealt with careful timing, and not watering any longer than it takes for runoff to appear. If runoff appears before the soil has received enough water, then you have to "cycle and soak" with repeat waterings separated by a time period for the water to soak in.

NABRIL

Active Member

3

Tuesday, December 11th 2012, 8:53am

thank you.

what is cycle and soak? I have my timer set for 24 mins (2 pegs of 12). Is that perhaps too long? Should I have 12 mins, 12 min wait, 12 min water? How do I accomplish that? As you know, when Intermatic timers shut off, the valve switches to the other zone. So to water, pause, and water, I would have to come up with some ingenious way to use the metal pegs, and it will be too confusing...and actually impossible.

I have 2 zones--my rotating heads, and my stationary popus. My timer is presently set to 24 min for zone 1, 6 min break, and 24 min for zone 2. How do I do (automatically): zone 1, off for 6 mins, zone 2, off for 6 mins, zone 2 again?



I need to look at how my rotary heads water and do some research.



what can I do about my 180 degree heads that seem to spray to 185 degrees and soaking the sidewalk? Use adjustable angle heads?




Slopes are generally dealt with careful timing, and not watering any longer than it takes for runoff to appear. If runoff appears before the soil has received enough water, then you have to "cycle and soak" with repeat waterings separated by a time period for the water to soak in.

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

4

Tuesday, December 11th 2012, 11:11am

Don't know what kind of controller you have (metal pegs?), maybe time for an upgrade that will easily allow more options.

You can get adjustable heads that will go less than 180 degrees.

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,054

Location: Metro NYC

5

Tuesday, December 11th 2012, 1:59pm

If you are pumping ground water in Florida, and using an indexing valve, your water is so cheap that you can have all the puddles you can stand.

The indexing valve controllers can run more than one watering cycle a day. You just need the trippers for the extra cycle(s)

NABRIL

Active Member

6

Tuesday, December 11th 2012, 8:01pm

thank you again wet boots
Don't know what kind of controller you have (metal pegs?), maybe time for an upgrade that will easily allow more options.

You can get adjustable heads that will go less than 180 degrees.

I have an intermatic mechanical timer (yellow wheel) that has metal pegs that you put in it to trip the on/off. Each peg position is 12 minutes of on or off. So I have 2 pegs after each other for zone 1 (the big rotary heads), an empty peg (to let the valve switch), and 2 more pegs for zone 2 (the stationary heads). I had an irrigation company install this, so I was not involved in the design.



I have an unused intermatic digital timer (EH40) that is designed for water heaters, but it will work here since my pump is less than 2hp.It can be programmed for different days and times and legths; however, I don't know how I would wire the rain sensor to it.

Now. You suggest an upgrade with more options. Can you give me an example? I am all for digital timers.



Yes, I am using well water, but I would prefer to not waste water and see it puddle on my sidewalk. I dont know if I am using an indexing valve. How can I tell.

wsommariva

Supreme Member

Posts: 332

Location: Northern New Jersey

7

Wednesday, December 12th 2012, 8:29am

Wet boots says you can just get new pegs. If that works I would stick with it and save some $$.

Hunter has a good selection of controllers. Basic up to advanced. Check their site. I assume you have low voltage wire to the valves?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,054

Location: Metro NYC

8

Wednesday, December 12th 2012, 8:43am

the Intermatic valve will directly power the pump, so nothing else will do, unless you really like complicating things. If you run a zone for 24 minutes, you can always remove one 'pin' and run it for 12 minutes instead.

NABRIL

Active Member

9

Wednesday, December 12th 2012, 9:46am

I have no wires to the valve and the valve switches on its own after 6 seconds of off time (i was told).

Why new pegs?


Wet boots says you can just get new pegs. If that works I would stick with it and save some $$.

Hunter has a good selection of controllers. Basic up to advanced. Check their site. I assume you have low voltage wire to the valves?

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