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1

Tuesday, April 3rd 2012, 10:54am

Why aren't people converting to Drip irrigation?

We see it as a great benefit. Why the low interest?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,044

Location: Metro NYC

2

Tuesday, April 3rd 2012, 11:26am

There is drip and there is drip. When drip is done by way of buried emitter tubing, it breaks when any planting is done. If buried drip fails to work, you know it when plants start dying. Sprays give you a chance to see that the watering is functional.

Drip done by way of emitters with above-ground outlets is more complex and expensive, but it has the advantage of being observable during operation.

hi.todd

Supreme Member

Posts: 415

Location: Houston, Texas

3

Tuesday, April 3rd 2012, 1:04pm

YEAH

What He said! :thumbsup:
:thumbup: :thumbsup:

4

Tuesday, April 3rd 2012, 2:46pm

Y'all are killing me!

No interest from your customers at all?

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,044

Location: Metro NYC

5

Tuesday, April 3rd 2012, 3:56pm

Customers can ask, but if I answer their questions honestly, they understand my concerns about drip. I think most of the buried drip emitter tubing is installed by landscapers who are putting in plantings and irrigation at the same time.

I like discrete emitters for watering arbor vitae, a popular border planting. One or two emitters for each plant, with tubing and stake and 'bug cap'

hi.todd

Supreme Member

Posts: 415

Location: Houston, Texas

6

Tuesday, April 3rd 2012, 7:43pm

I like drip for patio pots or limited application. The new mp rotator family of products is great. I also like the new Toro O series nozzles.

Drip has its place, but the yard or flowerbed is a tough environment.

:thumbsup:
:thumbup: :thumbsup:

Mitchgo

Supreme Member

Posts: 502

Location: Seattle

7

Monday, May 7th 2012, 1:01am

I use drip Netafim on hedge lines , small shrub bed applications, decks and pots. I would for small grass zones but I'm not the business owner of the company. I service many many drip applications though

I know drip is a huge water conservation but it does have it's place. The larger the area the less chance I will use it. It has much higher maintence, and sometimes in the long run you are paying more to take care of it then saving money with less water.

r0nj0n3s

New Member

Posts: 3

Location: Rockville Centre, New York

8

Thursday, May 31st 2012, 9:42pm

Drip Irrigation

Is there a tutorial for the DIY person for installing drip irrigation ?

9

Friday, June 1st 2012, 8:31am


Take a look HERE for step by step instructions and a link to download a guide from DIG Corp, one of the major drip irrigation suppliers.

Buddytronic

Starting Member

10

Tuesday, June 5th 2012, 12:57am

RE: Why aren't people converting to Drip irrigation?

We see it as a great benefit. Why the low interest?




I think there is some intimidation factor involved with Micro Irrigation.

Perhaps the costs are "unknown" to the beginner. You can get a "mister" for $1.95, and a pack of 5 "drippers" for $2.95 but what does this mean if you don't know what exactly a variable mister is. They are so small, the beginner guy is left wondering if this going to put out enough water. I remember staring at all the fittings and so forth, I'll admit it was a bit intimidating.

I definitely see Micro Irrigation becoming more popular in time.

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