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aswilburn

Senior Member

1

Wednesday, July 20th 2011, 1:59pm

PGV Questions

Ready for blow out, so I got a few questions! I want to operate my valves all 3 ways while blowing out!

1) once I turn the water on to the valves, I understand they may leak a little then close correct?
2) if I want to turn the solenoid to open the valve, must it have current to it?
3) should I male sure bleed screws are tight before turning on water? What position do they normally stay in?
4) when should I wire up the valves? Before I start or after I check for valve operation manually?

I guess these all go together but Im sure you guys can understand what I'm asking? Thanks in advance?

servicetechMA

Advanced Member

2

Wednesday, July 20th 2011, 7:08pm

hmmmmm. lol. I have blown out thousands of systems,you only need to do it from the clock. But,if you want to do it all three ways,its certainly not going to hurt a thing.
-1st, They really shouldnt leak,or you should not see any water comming out of them.Water may pass through them for a second. If thats what you mean by leak,you are correct. If you are seeing water,thats not really normal.
-2nd There does not need to be any current to manually open/bleed a valve. Valves are basically operated by high and low pressure differences above and below the diaphram. The solenoid and bleeder makes a seal,when you break that seal pressure pops open the diaphram and allows water to pass through,no electricity needed.
-3rd You dont have to,but its a good idea. they are normally closed by tightening,on weathermatic's,the lever should be horizontal to close,and vertical to open. most other valves everything is tight when closed and loose when open/bled.
-4th Wire them up anytime. If you have water to a new valve,they are going to open. if you get a faulty one it may not close.Rain bird DV 100's had a flaw in the o ring that goes on the solenoid,it caused them not to close,thats fixed now. I believe it was a yellow O-Ring,might of been green. If you have one of those that should be the only time youd have any issues,new valves work 99.9999% of the time.

aswilburn

Senior Member

3

Wednesday, July 20th 2011, 8:47pm

hmmmmm. lol. I have blown out thousands of systems,you only need to do it from the clock. But,if you want to do it all three ways,its certainly not going to hurt a thing.
-1st, They really shouldnt leak,or you should not see any water comming out of them.Water may pass through them for a second. If thats what you mean by leak,you are correct. If you are seeing water,thats not really normal.
-2nd There does not need to be any current to manually open/bleed a valve. Valves are basically operated by high and low pressure differences above and below the diaphram. The solenoid and bleeder makes a seal,when you break that seal pressure pops open the diaphram and allows water to pass through,no electricity needed.
-3rd You dont have to,but its a good idea. they are normally closed by tightening,on weathermatic's,the lever should be horizontal to close,and vertical to open. most other valves everything is tight when closed and loose when open/bled.
-4th Wire them up anytime. If you have water to a new valve,they are going to open. if you get a faulty one it may not close.Rain bird DV 100's had a flaw in the o ring that goes on the solenoid,it caused them not to close,thats fixed now. I believe it was a yellow O-Ring,might of been green. If you have one of those that should be the only time youd have any issues,new valves work 99.9999% of the time.


My fault on #1, yes I meant pass through!

Thanks for the info!

Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,078

Location: Metro NYC

4

Wednesday, July 20th 2011, 10:55pm

Just use the controller

aswilburn

Senior Member

5

Thursday, July 21st 2011, 2:46am

Just use the controller


Controller, what controller?


Just kidding!

Matt Dildy

Senior Member

Posts: 17

Location: Fort Worth TX

6

Tuesday, July 26th 2011, 2:18pm

i know i am in the minority here and i see a ton of contractors "blowing out" systems after completely closing up mainline. as an installer i have always left a place in the mainline as far from meter open to "blow out" before plumbing it closed, weather it be a looped or not. like i said i am in the minority but i would rather blow as much of my large debris (if any) out an open ended pipe than force it all through the valves. but hey i have made a pretty penny on properties that were never "blown" only to have stuck valves a few months later so i guess either way is better than not at all.

Central Irrigation

Supreme Member

Posts: 364

Location: Central Minnesota

7

Tuesday, July 26th 2011, 5:12pm

Are we talking "Winterizing Blow Out" or "Flushing the Mainline"?

Matt Dildy

Senior Member

Posts: 17

Location: Fort Worth TX

8

Tuesday, July 26th 2011, 9:36pm

Are we talking "Winterizing Blow Out" or "Flushing the Mainline"?
i assumed the original post was talking about new installation "blow out" since they mentioned connecting wires before or after. here in tx since we dont need to winterize irrigation systems "blow out and flush" are used interchangably, both mean the first flush and pressure test on new mainline.

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