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Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 4,063

Location: Metro NYC

11

Friday, July 30th 2010, 5:48am

Static (no-flow) pressure should be a factor of elevation as much as anything else. If you measure 42 psi, then a close neighbor at the same elevation should also have 42 psi. Unfortunately for lawn sprinkling, 30 psi is actually considered adequate for supplying a home. The purveyor doesn't 'owe' you a higher water pressure. If your static pressure can get as low as 30 psi, then you are looking to install a booster pump. Have you considered the possibility of drilling your own well? In return for the initial investment, you get all the pressure you want, and cheaper water besides.

kao_nevar

New Member

Posts: 5

Location: Texas

12

Friday, July 30th 2010, 10:43am

Static (no-flow) pressure should be a factor of elevation as much as anything else. If you measure 42 psi, then a close neighbor at the same elevation should also have 42 psi. Unfortunately for lawn sprinkling, 30 psi is actually considered adequate for supplying a home. The purveyor doesn't 'owe' you a higher water pressure. If your static pressure can get as low as 30 psi, then you are looking to install a booster pump. Have you considered the possibility of drilling your own well? In return for the initial investment, you get all the pressure you want, and cheaper water besides.


Actually, in the state of Texas, they are required to provide a steady rating of at least 35psi so yes, I can demand at least that. I guess I'll be looking into a booster pump.
How complicated is drilling a well? And it that allowed inside a city? While rural, I'm still in a city. I wasn't aware that I could do other than city water.

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