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The last 8 posts

Monday, August 8th 2016, 11:27am

by Wet_Boots

A city park to be watered by non-city water is not a concept that fits what takes place in a city like Boston, or in any town or city in our country. The satellite photo shows Ramsay Park to consist of a baseball field, and some grassland with fully mature trees. If Ramsay Park is to become as verdant as nearby Madison Park, it will not happen on a $400 budget.

Tell us more about this project. What's being watered, and where? Clearly something off the beaten path is going on here.

Monday, August 8th 2016, 9:11am

by Kekleon

Your budget is not realistic. A code-approved connection to city water could easily consume the entire amount.

In any event, lacking the power to run a controller and conventional valves, you move to battery-powered valves, where the controller and valve are a single unit.
Not relying on city water sources

Wednesday, August 3rd 2016, 12:31pm

by Wet_Boots

Your budget is not realistic. A code-approved connection to city water could easily consume the entire amount.

In any event, lacking the power to run a controller and conventional valves, you move to battery-powered valves, where the controller and valve are a single unit.

Wednesday, August 3rd 2016, 9:21am

by Kekleon

I would like to hear why solar power can't be employed.
1. 400$ Budget
2. Already overbudget
3. No place to put solar panels or wiring
4. Building using wood
5. Park has lots of trees (aka shade)
6. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ramsay+Park,+Boston,+MA+02118/@42.3342934,-71.0824206,17z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x89e37a3c33ff4bc9:0x7a2b4711a124647!8m2!3d42.3344581!4d-71.0806043
Use google earth to view the park

Tuesday, August 2nd 2016, 1:37pm

by Wet_Boots

I would like to hear why solar power can't be employed.

Tuesday, August 2nd 2016, 10:08am

by Kekleon

Only if you have solar power is anything like this feasible.
How long do you think a long life battery powered system could last for?

Monday, August 1st 2016, 2:28pm

by Wet_Boots

Only if you have solar power is anything like this feasible.

Monday, August 1st 2016, 1:38pm

by Kekleon

Permanent non-battery run drip irrigation.

Hi, I'm helping design something for a park and I'm trying to find out if there is any sort of irrigation system that would last forever or at least for a very long time without having to operate manually or use batteries or electricity.

P.S.: This is under the assumption that we have indefinite supplies of water and that it wont clog.