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The last 10 posts

Wednesday, April 5th 2006, 11:27am

by drpete3

Lush you are replying to a post that is 2 years old.

Thursday, March 30th 2006, 4:29pm

by lush96

if you go 10 gpm on 3/4 service with 50 psi.........good luck. go 6- 8 as 50 psi is extremely low. if you had a 1 inch service you could easily go 10 gpm on 50 psi. not on 3/4.

Thursday, March 30th 2006, 4:23pm

by lush96

im responding to the original post, pete. scroll up and read.

Thursday, March 30th 2006, 2:44am

by drpete3

Lush are you suggesting to use a booster pump with a well? I have been trying for 2 years to find out if this can be done and how it would work.

Sunday, March 19th 2006, 7:01pm

by lush96

pressure is the same no matter what size pipe. gpm is better the larger the pipe. your 3/4 inch service will provide about 6-8 gpm. thats why you tap of that and not half inch. psi and flow(gpm) go hand in hand. the 5 gallon bucket test for flow is a good method. to be safe, tap off your 3/4 inch service and dont exceed 6 gpm. if it is going to make too many zones that way, get a booster pump. booster pumps are very tricky and difficult for the average homeowner to install properly. a pro may be needed unless you know plumbing and electrical very well. but it will make a BIG difference.

Sunday, November 27th 2005, 9:32am

by bsculley

Oops, I think I posted an empty message, sorry.

I am desiging am irrigation system for a house in Italy. There are many challanges, including the fact that the water supply is a well. I had thought to measure the capacity using the Toro 53351, but maybe not... I would still like to try this method, does anybody have one they would like to sell?

Sunday, November 27th 2005, 9:28am

by bsculley

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by SprinklerHead</i>
<br />I too have used the Toro 53351 flow/pressure meter and found it to be way off from the 5 gal bucket calculation method, (I am still trying to find someone who can explain that). To get a good idea of your flow at the design pressure, attach a hose to the hose bib near the meter inside the house. Run the water from there into a drain or sump crock and bring the flow up until the pressure stays constant at or above the design pressure (You may have to fasion a few fitings and a gauge to messure the pressure while you do this if there is not already one in place). Once the pressure stays constant for several minutes, fill a 5 gal bucket and measure the time to do so. You may want to do this several times and take the average number. Then complete this calculation, 60secs / secs to fill 5 gals x 5 = gallon per minut of flow. Be sure that you know the point at which your bucket measures 5 gals as many actually hold more than that.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Saturday, May 15th 2004, 2:19pm

by SprinklerHead

I too have used the Toro 53351 flow/pressure meter and found it to be way off from the 5 gal bucket calculation method, (I am still trying to find someone who can explain that). To get a good idea of your flow at the design pressure, attach a hose to the hose bib near the meter inside the house. Run the water from there into a drain or sump crock and bring the flow up until the pressure stays constant at or above the design pressure (You may have to fasion a few fitings and a gauge to messure the pressure while you do this if there is not already one in place). Once the pressure stays constant for several minutes, fill a 5 gal bucket and measure the time to do so. You may want to do this several times and take the average number. Then complete this calculation, 60secs / secs to fill 5 gals x 5 = gallon per minut of flow. Be sure that you know the point at which your bucket measures 5 gals as many actually hold more than that.

Wednesday, April 7th 2004, 6:17pm

by m7317

thanks for all the help!!!

Wednesday, April 7th 2004, 7:18am

by drpete3

the 2.25 is not gpm it is a multiplication factor. The 2.25 is how much more volume the 3/4 can carry comparred to the 1/2.

I agree 1" all the way for the rest of your system.