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The last 10 posts

Friday, July 13th 2012, 1:22pm

by john flavia (Guest)

threaded connection wont stop leaking

I layer of tape definitely won't do it.
Try 3 or 4. Brass threads are sharp and can cut right through it.
I haven't used paste in a while but can't see why you couldn't.
Thanks... I'll try that first as it's the easiest. Then if that doesn't work, I'll try the teflon paste.

Friday, July 13th 2012, 1:09pm

by GatorGuy

I layer of tape definitely won't do it.
Try 3 or 4. Brass threads are sharp and can cut right through it.
I haven't used paste in a while but can't see why you couldn't.

Friday, July 13th 2012, 11:57am

by john flavia (Guest)

Connection Backflow preventer (brass?) to PVC fitting = leak !!!

I just installed my 5-zone manifold system using 900 ft of 1-inch PVC. Everything looks great, works well...except I have 2 slow drip leaks that I'm compelled to fix. Both are a brass (?) ball valve female-threaded fitting to PVC male thread (one on main stop valve and other is on one end of the backflow preventer). I've put Teflon tape on the male threads, but only 1 layer deep. I've now done this twice (the second time I reconstructed the entire glued elbow (adapter-to-elbow-to-union) which is easy to dissassemble because I used a union in front and behind my backflow preventer (for easy winterization = bring it inside). I'm starting to think, and read online in several forums suggesting that teflon paste should be used on metal-to-PVC fittings of 1-inch or greater? Is this the trick? I may try 3-4 wraps of teflon tape first as I've now seen those suggestions whereas I've only used 1 wrap, trying not to double wrap anywhere (which seems like the wrong thing to do from what I'm seeing posted?). Any comments are appreciated. All my glue connections are great!

Sunday, February 13th 2011, 2:56am

by Mitchgo



Agreed .... with the one exception that I use both goop and tape on any metal joining, and avoid like the plague metal male to PVC female.
That should be a given!!

Well at least an ' always remember ' rule.

Saturday, February 12th 2011, 10:52pm

by Kiril (Guest)

Everyone is entitlied to their opinion of course so i'll voice mine.



Ive been in business for about 17 years doing irrigation only.



In my 17 yr career ive never been taught or told to wrap teflon tape "Backwards' of the thread direction.



I just did some online research to verify, and i cant find anywhere that says wrap in the opposite direction of the threads.



Ive ALWAYS wrapped teflon (3/4" wide or larger) in the SAME direction as the threads.



For plastic to plastic, usually 2 to 3 complete wraps (tight wraps) around the male end.


Hand tighten for plastic to plastic plus a 1/4 to half turn with a wrench.


For plastic to metal, use a HIGH quality pipe liquid teflon or pipe thread sealant. Hand tight plus a 1/2 to One complete turn with a Offset pipe wrench.

It has always been my understanding that if you wrap teflon tape backwards, it will bunch up and not thread into the fitting properly


Agreed .... with the one exception that I use both goop and tape on any metal joining, and avoid like the plague metal male to PVC female.

Saturday, February 12th 2011, 8:53pm

by kosterirrigation

Everyone is entitlied to their opinion of course so i'll voice mine.



Ive been in business for about 17 years doing irrigation only.



In my 17 yr career ive never been taught or told to wrap teflon tape "Backwards' of the thread direction.



I just did some online research to verify, and i cant find anywhere that says wrap in the opposite direction of the threads.



Ive ALWAYS wrapped teflon (3/4" wide or larger) in the SAME direction as the threads.



For plastic to plastic, usually 2 to 3 complete wraps (tight wraps) around the male end.


Hand tighten for plastic to plastic plus a 1/4 to half turn with a wrench.


For plastic to metal, use a HIGH quality pipe liquid teflon or pipe thread sealant. Hand tight plus a 1/2 to One complete turn with a Offset pipe wrench.

It has always been my understanding that if you wrap teflon tape backwards, it will bunch up and not thread into the fitting properly

Friday, February 11th 2011, 11:23pm

by Big O (Guest)

Just wanted send an update...

Looks like I got lucky. After a month, it now looks like the small leak we had actually went away by itself or at least it is not noticable anymore.



Thanks all for the feedback an insight...

Monday, October 4th 2010, 9:10am

by HooKooDooKu

Hi segask,



I have a similar situation where the thread to the valve leak very slowly (even though I used teflon tape) and tighted it very tight. I am starting to wonder if it is possible to over tightening it and possibly caused a crack (I used a wrench)?



Anyways, just curious if you found out if the small leak plugged itself up (got better) or if the leak got worst over time or if the small leak remained the same and you considered it good enough since it was out doors (in my case, the spinkler valve)?



Thanks!


Even if an irrigation system is "outdoors", if the leak in question is in a mineline (pipe under constant pressure) then that is unacceptable [to me] because it leaks 24/7. So a small leak on the output side of a valve might be tollerable, but a leak on the input side (that's under constant pressure from city water) is not.


In the time since this post was created, I've been able to install an irrigation/drip irrigation system around my house. I never did learn a procedure that would reliably create a leak-free connection, here's what I found worked most often:

Wrap the threads with teflon tape for 5 to 7 wraps. Before you screw the parts together, pre-seat the tape in the threads. For example, the thing I would usually do is cover my hand with a rag and make a loose fist. I would then try to screwn the taped threads into my hand (the "hole" between my thumb and fingers). Then proceed to screw the final pieces together.

To avoid splitting the connection, the rule of thumb is to tighten my hand, then use a wrench to tighten about 1/2 turn (1 full turn max). And if you are ever having to join PVC to metal, the PVC MUST be a male and the metal a female.

Monday, October 4th 2010, 12:37am

by mrfixit

I doubt Segask will make an appearance since his post is 7 years old. To answer your question you can definetly over tighten and break the plastic. Also all three of your questions are possible. It might stop. It might get worse, a lot. It might stay the same.

Can you tell me what model valve it is and what do you have screwed into it?

Just by off chance you used a Spears male adapter there's a problem with them cracking due to brittle plastic. They used to be an excellent fitting then Spears redesigned them.

Sunday, October 3rd 2010, 11:46pm

by Big O (Guest)

Hi segask,



I have a similar situation where the thread to the valve leak very slowly (even though I used teflon tape) and tighted it very tight. I am starting to wonder if it is possible to over tightening it and possibly caused a crack (I used a wrench)?



Anyways, just curious if you found out if the small leak plugged itself up (got better) or if the leak got worst over time or if the small leak remained the same and you considered it good enough since it was out doors (in my case, the spinkler valve)?



Thanks!