You are not logged in.

Reply

Dear visitor, welcome to SPRINKLER TALK FORUM - You Got Questions, We've Got Answers. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains how this page works. You must be registered before you can use all the page's features. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

Attention: The last reply to this post was 403 days ago. The thread may already be out of date. Please consider creating a new thread.

Message information
Message
Settings
Automatically converts internet addresses into links by adding [url] and [/url] around them.
Smiley code in your message such as :) is automatically displayed as image.
You can use BBCode to format your message, if this option is enabled.
Security measure

Please enter the letters that are shown in the picture below (without spaces, and upper or lower case can be used).

The last 10 posts

Friday, October 6th 2017, 3:24pm

by DoctorIrrigation (Guest)

What size main service line?

I have designed irrigation systems for decades, I don't know everything but here are my 2 cents.

5/8" and 3/4" meters 10 gpm
1" meters 15 gpm
1.5" meters 40 gpm
2" meters 60 gpm

You can go slightly beyond the listed gpm but remember the meter is supplying water for other purposes besides irrigation.

In all my design experience I never had a system not work using this formula, except for one. After an on-site inspection I found a sever kink in the copper yolk just downstream of the 3/4" meter. The yolk was replaced by the City and the problem was solved.

BTW, never confuse pressure with flow, they are two totally different things. The meter with the kinked yolk had almost 90 psi but the flow was only about 4 gpm because of the kinked yolk.

Hope this helps. :thumbup:

Friday, October 6th 2017, 3:20pm

by Wet_Boots

18-24 inches tall is a good practical minimum for the valves - if you have them too low, the tops can get chewed on by rodents with their feet on the ground, like a scratching post for their teeth - sides of pipes they don't bother

standard rotor heads are fine - only for long slopes do you need heads with check valves to counteract drainage

I don't use controllers with 4 separate programs. No need for it. Hunter makes the X-Core series, with 3 programs, and the features anyone might need.

Monday, October 2nd 2017, 6:34pm

by Tim57

A couple few more questions:

1. Regarding the subject of anti-siphon valves requiring to be 12" higher than the sprinkler heads. Do you measure this elevation difference from the ground level of the sprinkler head or the elevation they're at when in operation i.e., the pop-up sprinkler heads.

2. If I'm using the Irritrol 2713APR, can I go with the bottom of the line Rain Bird 5000 heads since I can adjust the pressure of the entire zone at the 2713? I don't think I'll benefit from the added features of the top of the line heads. Your thoughts.

3. What is your recommended controller based on the following features:
a. Indoor installation
b. 5-6 Zones and 4 programs
c. Rain Sensor
d. Master Control Valve
e. Non-Volatile Memory
f. Seasonal Adjustments

Thank you.

Friday, September 29th 2017, 5:29pm

by Tim57

A couple few more questions:

1. Regarding the subject of anti-siphon valves requiring to be 12" higher than the sprinkler heads. Do you measure this elevation difference from the ground level of the sprinkler head or the elevation they're at when in operation i.e., the pop-up sprinkler heads.

2. If I'm using the Irritrol 2713APR, can I go with the bottom of the line Rain Bird 5000 heads since I can adjust the pressure of the entire zone at the 2713? I don't think I'll benefit from the added features of the top of the line heads. Your thoughts.

3. What is your recommended controller based on the following features:
a. Indoor installation
b. 5-6 Zones and 4 programs
c. Rain Sensor
d. Master Control Valve
e. Non-Volatile Memory
f. Seasonal Adjustments

Thank you.
Thank you.

Thursday, September 28th 2017, 12:33pm

by Wet_Boots

Black spray paint is fine for lessening the visibility of the PVC pipe, as well as providing some UV protection (the valves don't need UV protection) - If you have the sprinklers next to the fence on head-to-head spacing, a shallow flowerbed can be covered from the lawn heads - there are self-seeding annuals that can work as a border bed - I've seen sweet alyssum used this way, and it gives a nice scent when there's enough of it


Thursday, September 28th 2017, 11:08am

by Tim57

The pipes would be sticking out of either flower beds or small landscaping rocks but not grass. I'm still thinking about how to disguise the white pvc as a couple of the pipes will be 24 inches tall. I thought maybe wrapping the pipes with black electricians tape would help conceal them against the black chain link fencing. I don't know what else I can do given my topography and the need to locate the anti-siphon valves 12 inches above the sprinkler heads and avoiding the underground back flow valves. Your thoughts please.

Thank you!

Tuesday, September 26th 2017, 10:10am

by Wet_Boots

A fenced border on which to locate valves changes everything. It even allows you to have a flowerbed bordering the lawn, providing a buffer between plumbing and lawn. (you really don't want the pipes sticking out of the grass area)

Monday, September 25th 2017, 11:57am

by Tim57

Remember, my irrigation mainline comes right off the "T" at the meter. The other side goes to the house. I was referring to the water between the ball-valve controlling the flow from the meter to the zone control valves. I wasn't planning to have a manifold. I was planning to run my 1-1/4" mainline from the meter (located on the NE corner of the lot) along the northern (highest elevation) property line tapping into it with 1" (2713APR) zone control valve elevated at least 12" above the highest sprinkler head being serviced by the valve. The valves will be protected by the fencing along the line. I guess I could place a drain valve immediately downstream of the main shut-off ball valve that could be opened to drain the irrigation mainline. Your thoughts please.


Sunday, September 24th 2017, 9:39am

by Wet_Boots

No regulator needed. As for winter, You want to drain the mainline running from meter to house, just so any above-ground plumbing is cleared of water. (the ASVs allow water to drain from the downstream side - your manual drain will take care of the upstream side)

If you add a hose bib to the upstream side of the manifold plumbing, that would be your air connection for winterizing the sprinklers. Seattle seems to avoid the cold winter temperatures, for the most part, but historic lows are definitely the sort of thing that would damage a system with water still in it.

The plumbing rules actually consider a mainline upstream of the backflow prevention as part of the potable plumbing, so you don't worry about the water it contains being contaminated.

Saturday, September 23rd 2017, 6:43pm

by Tim57

Okay, a couple more questions:
1. With a static 86psi coming off the meter, do I need a pressure regulator valve? It seems to me that I'm coming off the 1-1/4" mainline with a 1" pipe to my zone valve. If the 2713 APR will handle the pressure at this point then I can always adjust the valve as needed for each zone. Your thoughts?
2. What happens with the water left in the mainline after the winter? It seems that this water could be siphoned into the house supply line when the mainline is opened in the spring. Your expertise please?
Thank you again....