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The last 10 posts

Tuesday, November 18th 2014, 6:29pm

by sdgardener

The adjustable nozzles work just fine now. I may try those no-springs spray heads when I need to install new sprinklers.

Tuesday, November 18th 2014, 2:22pm

by Wet_Boots

Gravity makes the no-springs spray heads retract. They can be had in both plastic or (better) brass.


Tuesday, November 18th 2014, 12:43pm

by sdgardener

How does a sprayer pops up without a spring?

I think that the higher your valves are, the less chance they create wet spots. My valves are almost 4 feet above the ground. They are high enough for now.

Do I need to pain those PVC pipes above the ground with silver paint to prevent them from Sun damage?

Tuesday, November 18th 2014, 9:09am

by Wet_Boots

If the landscape allows, you might try some of the cheesy no-springs popup sprays found at home centers.

Is it a given that you can't raise your valves a couple feet higher? More elevation would help.

Sunday, November 16th 2014, 5:21pm

by sdgardener

I replaced RainBird 1800 Series (1804-VAN) spring-loaded pop-up sprayers with RainBird 15' adjustable nozzle attached to 1/2' x 10' PVC nipples.

Sunday, November 16th 2014, 5:29am

by mrfixit

The spring-loaded pop-up sprayers are the culprits. Here was the number of spring-loaded pop-up sprayers this morning.

Zone 1 and 2: no spring-loaded pop-up sprayers, dry valves.
Zone 3 (the highest zone): 2 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers were replaced with regular sprinkler heads, the valve creates wet spot.
Zone 4 (at the bottom of the slope): 4 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers, dry valve.
Zone 5 (at the top of the slope): 2 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers were replaced with regular sprinkler heads, dry valve.

This afternoon, I replaced 2 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers in Zone 4 first. The valve in Zone 3 still created web spot after it's turned off. I then replaced one more spring-loaded pop-up sprayers in Zone 4. The valve in Zone 3 has been completely dry after it's turned on and off several times. Problem solved!

I didn't replace the last spring-loaded pop-up sprayer in Zone 4 because it's located in a high traffic area.

Thank Wet Boots and Mr. Fixit very much again for your help!

Cheers!


I'm not convinced.

What do you mean you replaced the spring loaded sprinklers with regular sprinklers.

Can you tell us what sprinklers you replaced and what you replaced them with?

Saturday, November 15th 2014, 7:40pm

by sdgardener

The spring-loaded pop-up sprayers are the culprits. Here was the number of spring-loaded pop-up sprayers this morning.

Zone 1 and 2: no spring-loaded pop-up sprayers, dry valves.
Zone 3 (the highest zone): 2 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers were replaced with regular sprinkler heads, the valve creates wet spot.
Zone 4 (at the bottom of the slope): 4 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers, dry valve.
Zone 5 (at the top of the slope): 2 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers were replaced with regular sprinkler heads, dry valve.

This afternoon, I replaced 2 spring-loaded pop-up sprayers in Zone 4 first. The valve in Zone 3 still created web spot after it's turned off. I then replaced one more spring-loaded pop-up sprayers in Zone 4. The valve in Zone 3 has been completely dry after it's turned on and off several times. Problem solved!

I didn't replace the last spring-loaded pop-up sprayer in Zone 4 because it's located in a high traffic area.

Thank Wet Boots and Mr. Fixit very much again for your help!

Cheers!

Friday, November 14th 2014, 7:15am

by Wet_Boots

Someone suggests that I install a downstream check valve to stop the spillage under the zone 3 valve. Is that a good idea?
If you accept the no-nonsense viewpoint of the codes, you never install a check valve directly downstream of an antisyphon valve, ever. That would keep standing pressure in the vacuum breaker on a 24/7 basis, which can render it useless, because given enough time under pressure, the float will stick to the cover.

Change to a PVB (pressure vacuum breaker) and inline valves, and everything will stay dry, and will be code, so long as at least a foot of elevation exists between the downstream heads and piping and the bottom of the PVB.

Friday, November 14th 2014, 1:50am

by mrfixit

Someone suggested installing a check valve. What a novel idea...

You're asking my personal opinion so here it is.

With spring loaded check valves installed there wont be any backflow reaching the Rainbird valve so there's no worry about contaminated water rushing back past the valve and into the drinking water.

Your installation isn't up to code as it is anyway....

I have no more input on this issue.

Good luck!

Thursday, November 13th 2014, 10:11pm

by sdgardener

Mr. Fixit,

Thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with us!

The amount of spillage from the anti-syphon cap is small. But it still creates a wet spot, which I don't like.

To avoid water runoff, I run my sprinkler system 2 minutes at a time and several times a day between 4:30 am and 5:30 am. For each time I run, I get a spillage from the anti-syphon cap. It just adds up.

Someone suggests that I install a downstream check valve to stop the spillage under the zone 3 valve. Is that a good idea?