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The last 5 posts

Thursday, June 27th 2013, 4:26am

by Wet_Boots

Well, I'm just confused why it doesn't work now. Alot of people around the area do not have the pressure tanks. Woudn't the pressure tank cause my pump to cycle on and off several times throughout the entire sprinkling time?
Pumps work better when they have something to push against. That's what a pressure tank provides. You will find it makes a better solution than wringing your hands over why your present setup isn't working right. If you are dead set against adding a pressure tank, then you can put back the original zone valves and tell the missus to stop complaining. Obviously, the new valves aren't giving the pump enough to push against. (zone valves with flow controls might solve the problem, but then again they might not)

A pump cycles because of a mismatch between supply and load. It is up to you to design a sprinkler system that matches the output of the pump. A pressure tank never causes cycling.

Wednesday, June 26th 2013, 7:50pm

by apbling (Guest)

Install a small pressure tank, and set the switch to shut the pump off at some useful pressure in the 30 to 40 psi range. Scrap the relay. (you should already have a relief valve in place) Pump performance improves, and zone valves behave better. If the zone valves don't already have flow controls on them, expect to make that upgrade.

OK. Well, I'm just confused why it doesn't work now. Alot of people around the area do not have the pressure tanks. Woudn't the pressure tank cause my pump to cycle on and off several times throughout the entire sprinkling time? Where can I snag a pressure relief valve? Any recommendations?

`

By the way, a pressurized setup requires a check valve be in place, usuauly on the suction side of the pump, so the water doesn't pour back into the well point after sprinkler operation.
Yep, I have a check valve on the suction to keep the pump primed.

Wednesday, June 26th 2013, 10:02am

by Wet_Boots

Install a small pressure tank, and set the switch to shut the pump off at some useful pressure in the 30 to 40 psi range. Scrap the relay. (you should already have a relief valve in place) Pump performance improves, and zone valves behave better. If the zone valves don't already have flow controls on them, expect to make that upgrade.

`

By the way, a pressurized setup requires a check valve be in place, usually on the suction side of the pump, so the water doesn't pour back into the well point after sprinkler operation.

Wednesday, June 26th 2013, 10:01am

by apbling (Guest)

additional info

After reading a few other posts here, I have some additional info:



I have 5 zones, 3 with rainbird 5000+ series, 1 with a few popups and one for the garden with hose bibs and conventional sprinklers. All my regular zones operate at about 40-45 psi. My issues is ONLY when the pump starts and sometimes between zones. For example, I hit the water all now, relay clicks, pump starts, pressures up (because of the dead head), kicks off (sometimes it stays off, sometimes it cycles). Valve finally opens and pump takes off without an issue. Then when it's time for zone 2, zone one valve shuts and sometimes (50/50 chance) zone 2 valve doesn't open quickly enough and the pump may kick off or cycle. I thougth it was my valves, but like I said I got new ones. It would be nice if the controller would open the valve first, or open the next zone valve a second before closing the first one...



I'm thinking of using a pressure relief, but if I set it for the dead head pressure of my pump I think it will be releasing every time that my pump now cycles... Another idea is maybe I shouldn't set my pressure switch so high? (near dead head). If I set if for something like 50 psi, it might not cycle but instead just kick out for a bit?

Wednesday, June 26th 2013, 9:36am

by apbling (Guest)

pump relay/controller/valve issues?

Hi All,

First off, I'm a homeowner and set up my sprinker system myself, with some supposed "professional" help from a friend of mine.

Anyway, I have a 1 1/4" sand point well, a 1 HP Red Cap jet pump, Rainbird SST600O timer and an orbit relay/pump starter. I originally had 5 orbit 1" anti-siphon valves on a header that sat above my pump. I set the pump pressure switch to open at just about dead head pressure in case of a valve failed to open. Last year I had 0 issues. This year, the wife had me re-pipe and beautify it a bit. I ran the same diameter pipe (1"), but instead of having the valves above the pump, they are now next to it in a nice enclosure. When the timer started the pump, it would pressure up and chatter the pump because the pressure switch kept kicking out. I figured the cheap orbit valves were sticky and opening slow. So I doubled checked all wiring and such, and ended up buying some 1" Hunter PGV jar type standard valves. I installed them. Now, the issue has gotten a bit better, but when I tell the timer to water, the relay kicks in immediately and the pump pressures up, but it seems like the valve hasn't opened quick enough so the pump kicks out a few times. Once the valve opens it's fine, but I don't like making the pump start and stop so many times in a short period of time. My "professional" buddy told me to bypass the switch and install a pressure relief valve. However, if the pump is dead heading for a few seconds while the valve is opening, I think every time I water it will be popping the relief open, which I really don't want either.

So, in summary, the only change I made since last year was take my header from on top of my pump and place it next to it at about the same elevation. I did end up adding a about 3 extra feet of 1" pipe and 2 elbows, but I have a hard time believe that is the issue.

At this point I am all out of ideas other than spending more money on a fancier timer that has a delay feature.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks!