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The last 8 posts

Monday, June 11th 2012, 2:00am

by 4U2NVME

If your zones ran two minutes each, you'd be done in less than half an hour.

{in other words, not enough information}

LOL, thank you helpful, your math seems accurate. What did you need to know. :D

Sunday, June 10th 2012, 6:55pm

by Wet_Boots

If your zones ran two minutes each, you'd be done in less than half an hour.

{in other words, not enough information}

Sunday, June 10th 2012, 3:28pm

by 4U2NVME

For an acre-and-a-half, 50 gpm is overkill, even on sandy soil. 20 gpm would do just fine, which keeps you with standard 1-inch zone valves. This also changes the pump situation. You can use a 1 HP jet pump, which gains more pressure in exchange for delivering less flow.

As for the system drawing, it lacks a scale, so no one on the internet can know exactly what you are looking at. You need to add a line with inch markings.





Attached is my rought scale drawing. I laid out drip irrigation for my trees and shrubs this weeked with the wife. We ended up going with emitters and a main line. Its all above ground but we will be buring it later. We went with a 1" poly pipe. We had to go that large because we only have 15 lbs static pressure atm and are waiting to put in the pump.
Its all running off the turnout nicely, but will balance out better when we can finally add pressure to it. I may do it on one or two zones, but right now its all running at the 15 psi.

50 gpm is over kill I know, but its nice to have. What would you suggest, We have 10 or so sprinker zones,

Is there a good pump that would run two seperte zones at once, I have found quite a few but its almost impossible to find pump curves on them. I would like to keep it to about 500.00 for the pump but then again I maybe dreaming?

I do have static pressure of 15 psi, so does that mean I would only need to find a pump to boost it 35 - 40 PSI?

What is the difference between a booster pump, a jet pump, or the other types of pumps on the market.
I have not run my eletrical yet, so I would need to run it about 150 feet to my water shed from the house so I need to be thinking of that, if I need 120 or 240.

Is there a cost difference to run a 120 vs. a 240 pump, I know 240 you can run it on a smaller breaker, does that mean wire as well? But then I would need to bury two lines to get my 240 volt?

If I were to water all zones one at a time how long would that take, there are 10 sprinkler zones.
This is the controller I would like to use THIS ONE. If I am reading it correctly I can us this for up to 12 zones and its a controller, I don't need anything else besides my PC. Any feed back on it?


Friday, June 8th 2012, 8:45am

by Wet_Boots

For an acre-and-a-half, 50 gpm is overkill, even on sandy soil. 20 gpm would do just fine, which keeps you with standard 1-inch zone valves. This also changes the pump situation. You can use a 1 HP jet pump, which gains more pressure in exchange for delivering less flow.

As for the system drawing, it lacks a scale, so no one on the internet can know exactly what you are looking at. You need to add a line with inch markings.

Friday, June 8th 2012, 8:24am

by GatorGuy

Toro/Rain Bird both put out designs that will work, no doubt. However, they never do one as well as someone local who can get a better feel for what you are trying to do.

I want to emphasize that they will work and, considering the situation, are fairly good. I've done test drawings with them on a sample residence and they both sent acceptable if not ideal designs. And you can't beat the price.

The 18gpm is a restriction of the pipe. At a guess I'd say they recommended 1" Class 200 for that run. At that rate you get a velocity of 5.19 feet per second and a pressure loss of 3.87 psi per 100 foot. 5 fps tends to be a maximum number in many designs.

You can combine zones on similar areas (drip with drip, spray with spray) as long as your gpm stays in range.
One problem with that idea is if you combine 2 drip zones and end up with laterals involving very long runs you may lose too much pressure at the end to be effective. If you do combine make sure your valve is fairly central.

Friday, June 8th 2012, 2:06am

by 4U2NVME

Your numbers do not work, if you want economy. With economy first, you give up on 50+ psi in your system, and settle for about 40+ psi. This allows you to apply a simple centrifugal pump as a booster, because those pumps move good volume as long as the boost is 30 psi or so. For instance, a 1.5 HP centrifugal could boost a 50 gpm flow by 35 psi.

The key question, is how many acres are you watering? Flat ground?
Thanks for your Reply,
I am watering about 1.5 acers and the ground is close to flat. My water pump is located 5 - 7 feet ABOVE the lowest point, and maybe 3 - 5 feet below the highest point.
I got paid to have TORO do a design for me and they came back with 23 zones. I would like to reduce that a bit. They have 10 sprinker zones and about 13 drip and micro spray zones. Not sure why they set up or used so much drip line for my shelter belt (bushes)
I just got the design back and the max GPM per zone is 18, so even if the pump could handle 40 GPM?? They have stated that I need a pump that will handle 25 GPM at 55 working PSI, and that is for a zone with a max of the 18 GPM. I have attached the drawing that they provided me to give you a better idea of the layout. The drip zones are extremly small in water volume so not sure why they created so many zones. I think in total its about 50 gpm spread accross all the drip zones.
Thanks again for your help and input
-NV

Thursday, June 7th 2012, 8:20am

by Wet_Boots

Your numbers do not work, if you want economy. With economy first, you give up on 50+ psi in your system, and settle for about 40+ psi. This allows you to apply a simple centrifugal pump as a booster, because those pumps move good volume as long as the boost is 30 psi or so. For instance, a 1.5 HP centrifugal could boost a 50 gpm flow by 35 psi.

The key question, is how many acres are you watering? Flat ground?

Thursday, June 7th 2012, 1:58am

by 4U2NVME

Another Pump Question

Hello all,

I am currently looking to purchase a pump that will not break the bank. I am drawing water from an irrigation district, the specifics of what I am getting is as follows

GPM - 60+
PSI - 13 - 15 psi
Will be covered in a 10 * 16 Shed.

The questions I have are,

What is a good pump that can handle lets say 50 GPM with a working pressure of about 50 - 55 PSI?

Because my head or static pressure is at 15 PSI already, does that mean I only need a booster pump that is capable of only boosting 40 PSI? ( 55 PSI required pressure - 15 PSI static ) = 40??

What sizing of wire would I need to run to my shed and breaker size to properly run the pump.

Would I need a device that is after my zone controller to help my pump start up ( don't remember the name of it right now)

And am I missing anything that I should be considering?

Thanks all..

-NV